Posts Tagged ‘Book recommendations’

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In the Cut is an edgy, fast-paced thriller chock-full of tension, sex, and mystery with an ironic and exciting ending you won’t see coming. I finished this book in one sitting and was particularly struck by the unusual use of language and grammar (so many writing “rules” were beautifully broken here – I loved it) but what really propelled me was a fascinating protagonist in search of something she didn’t even know was missing.

I’d recommend this book. It’s an interesting story, sure, but there’s more to it; layers that intrigued and so much left to the imagination, despite some graphic descriptions. Think Psycho meets Looking for Mr. Goodbar.

Well done, Ms. Moore. I think I’ll be reading more of you.

For more: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/alistair-cross?list=reviews

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Gretchen is a thriller that will also appeal to lovers of horror. It’s told primarily from the point of view of Lucy, a teen who has spent her life on the run with her mother. Lucy has always been resigned to her fate – changing states, changing schools, keeping secrets – but now she’s beginning to rebel.

As the book begins, Lucy and her mother relocate to house in the country outside a small town. Their new landlord, a concert pianist, and his daughter, Gretchen, welcome them, and despite their eccentricities, Lucy wants to stay. From there, the eccentricities and Lucy’s discomfort grow, and the story – a fascinating mystery – unfolds.

The pages of this tight and twisted tale flew by – I could hardly turn them fast enough. Highly recommended.

For more: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/tamara-thorne?list=reviews

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When literary writer Thad Beaumont’s cover is blown and the world finds out he’s been moonlighting as a crime writer under the pseudonym, George Stark, blackmail promptly ensues. Rather than caving to the blackmailer’s demands, Thad Beaumont decides to go public – and kill off George Stark himself. That’s when the pseudonym takes on a life of his own and begins an angry murderous spree …

The Dark Half exhibits King’s many artistic gifts: Excellent characters, unforgettable horror, witty dialogue, and the kind of plot that keeps you turning page after page. You can’t help but get the feeling that King was taking a little revenge of his own with this book – and that only adds to the intrigue. Writers and readers alike will love this book.

For More: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/alistair-cross?list=reviews

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If you’ve ever read this book, you can see why someone said, “We must make this into a movie. Not only that, but it must star Bette Davis and Joan Crawford!” And while it definitely was an excellent movie, the book digs one layer deeper, submerging the reader (reluctantly, at times) into the minds of some seriously fascinating (and in Jane’s case, twisted) characters.

What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? is a quick read that sprinkles rather than spews its horror. It is, if nothing else, an intriguing glimpse not only into the human psyche (watching Jane’s descent into madness is one of those proverbial train wrecks you won’t be able to look away from) but also a peek into what might really be going on behind the closed doors of other quiet, seemingly peaceful houses.

As Jane and Blanche’s own next-door neighbor says, “Sometimes I wonder about the two of them over there in that big old house all alone. They don’t ever seem to do anything – or have anyone in for company. It must be awful … ”

Lady, you have no idea …

For more: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/alistair-cross?list=reviews

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I didn’t mean to read The Institute so fast. I meant to make it last, but with King, that’s usually impossible. I was eager to read this book because it’s vintage King. There’s a good whiff of Firestarter in the book simply because of setting and subject matter, but the story is handled quite differently. In Firestarter, certain bad guys, like Rainbird, really stood out to me, but here, they’re more of a troop, but each is well drawn and memorable in true King style.

The kids are well-drawn as well and very easy to tell apart. What The Institute has in common with the novel, It, is simply that it features a group of kids drawn together to fight for themselves. These kids are misfits for the most part and this plays out in wonderful ways.

Our primary hero is a super-intelligent boy named Luke. When I was near the half-way point in the book I was beginning to wonder if things were going to get more interesting. (Not that it wasn’t interesting, but I wanted a change of scenery.) There’s no need to worry. There’s more. Lots more.

The book explodes into a long climax mid-way and all the details carefully planted in the first half come into play. It becomes impossible to set the book down. And it all leads to a terrific and satisfying ending. The Institute is going to make a terrific movie one day. I can’t wait to see it.

For more: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/tamara-thorne?list=reviews

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I first read The Haunting of Hill House as a child when I happened on it at the library. It changed the course of my reading and my own writing. I’ve reread it half a dozen times over the years. Recently, after at least a fifteen-year hiatus, I read it again. It’s as wonderful as ever, and it held a few forgotten surprises, too.

The 1960 movie is very true to the book but it leaves out a mysterious scene that happens late in the book. Theo and Eleanor go outside and encounter a child’s birthday party. They see a dog; perhaps the same creature that leads the men away from the house early in the book. And then they see something else that sends them running back to Hill House in terror.

The chapter ends there and when it picks up it’s obvious they’ve told the men what they saw – but Jackson never informs the reader. I don’t know how I ever forgot about this delightfully creepy twist, but now it haunts me. What did they see? I’m going to read the book yet again very soon because of it. I had just turned 11 the first time I read it and I was struck by the stone lions and the cup of stars almost as much as the scrabbling at the doors and the phantom hand-holding.

I saw only a ghost story back then and I adored it. Later, I understood the psychological aspects as well as the sexual ones but preferred to remember my more innocent impressions. This time, in full maturity, I loved it for everything it contained. It’s a beautiful, elegant tragedy and probably the best ghost story ever written.

For more: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/tamara-thorne?list=reviews

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In A is for Alibi, private investigator (and in my opinion, one of the best characters ever written) Kinsey Millhone, is hired by a woman named Nikki Fife to re-investigate the murder of her husband – a murder that she, Nikki, was imprisoned for.

I love this entire series and A is for Alibi is just as strong as those that follow. It’s action-packed, smart, funny and – most important of all – it will keep mystery-lovers guessing and turning pages at top speed to find out whodunit.

For more: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/alistair-cross?list=reviews