Posts Tagged ‘horror’

Thursday, December 5th, at 8 pm EST, we’ll be chatting with author and associate movie producer. Listen in any time at Thorne & Cross: Haunted Nights LIVE!

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Joshua A.H. Harris is a writer, father, and recovering environmental attorney. He grew up in Laramie, Wyoming, served in the Peace Corps in Mali, West Africa, and currently lives in the Bay Area. Joshua holds degrees from Brown University, UC Davis, and San Francisco State University. His writings have appeared in the East Bay Times, Gravitas (Pub House Books), Berkeley Times, and Ars Poetica. In 2014, he wrote Out of the Fog, a serialized novel released one chapter per week over the course of a calendar year (available at outofthefogjh.blogspot.com). In 2017, Joshua became an associate editor for La Vil: Stories from the Streets of Port-au-Prince, Voice of Witness (San Francisco). More recently, he wrote and published Common Sense 2019: A Bipartisan Call to Take Back Our Government, a political pamphlet that addresses the fundamental problem of money in politics. Joshua is also an associate producer of the following movies: Night Comes On (2018) starring Dominique Fishback and Tatum Marilyn Hall; House of Tomorrow (2017), starring Asa Butterfield; Lucky (2017), starring Harry Dean Stanton; and Columbus (2017), starring John Cho, Haley Lu Richardson, Parker Posey.

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This is a copyrighted, trademarked podcast owned solely by the Authors on the Air Global Radio, LLC.

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Inspiring in very strange ways, Clive Barker’s Coldheart Canyon is in a class all its own. It’s horror, yes, but it’s more than that. It’s sexy, definitely … but it goes deeper. It’s creepy, of course … but again, there’s more to it than mere ghoulishness.

Clive Barker is a master of the depraved and wonderfully preposterous; no one does it like him and, like his other work, this Hollywood ghost story managed to keep me enthralled while simultaneously repelling me … and I loved it.

For more, visit Alistair on Bookbub

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JONATHAN MABERRY is a New York Times best-selling and multiple Bram Stoker Award-winning horror and thriller author, editor, comic book writer, magazine feature writer, playwright, content creator, writing teacher/lecturer, and creator of the Netflix series V-Wars, starring Ian Somerhalder. He was named one of the Today’s Top Ten Horror Writers. His books have been sold to more than two-dozen countries.

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We’ll be chatting with him at 8 pm EST on Thorne & Cross: Haunted Nights LIVE! Listen in anytime.

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Audrey Rose by Frank De Felitta is a fascinating, horror-ific tale of love, loss, and … reincarnation. I’ve read it three times now and despite its very 1970s vibe, it puts me – and keeps me – under its spell each time. 

This novel impresses me on a few levels:

As a writer, I admire De Felitta’s masterful execution; he not only has a way with words but with pacing, character development, and setting – not to mention, he knows how to dig deep, to mine the emotions of his readers in ways a lot of authors either aren’t able to or don’t dare to. 

As a reader, Audrey Rose impresses me with its ability to not only keep me turning pages but to creep into my thoughts during the day (and night) when I should be focused on other things; when I’m reading this book, I resent anything that interrupts me. Not only that, this story makes me ponder the possibility of deeper things – and I’m a sucker for anything that opens the mind.   

In short, this is one of my all-time favorite novels and I recommend it to anyone with a penchant for the dramatic, the mysterious, the dark, the frightening … and even the sweet and tender.

Five full stars.

For more, visit Alistair on Bookbub

Our gothic horror novel, The Ghosts of Ravencrest (book 1 in the Ravencrest Saga) is on sale for $0.99 in #ebook at Amazon today through the 20th!

THE GHOSTS OF RAVENCREST

(Book 1 in The Ravencrest Saga)

Ravencrest Manor casts long, black shadows across its grand lawns, through the surrounding forests, and over the picturesque town of Devilswood, below. It holds its memories – and its ghosts – close to its dark heart.

When governess Belinda Moorland arrives at Ravencrest to tutor Eric Manning’s children, it’s the most beautiful place she’s ever seen, but she soon learns that not only is it built on secrets, but its inhabitants keep plenty of their own – from the elegant English butler to the power-mad administrator, to handsome millionaire Eric Manning himself, who watches her with dark, fathomless eyes. But Belinda soon realizes that the living who dwell in Ravencrest have nothing on the others – the ones who walk the darkened halls by night … the ones who enter her dreams … the ones who are watching … and waiting … 

Ghostly screams echo as bony fingers clutch at her in the indoor pool. The spirit of a long-dead child calls to her. A trio of gibbering nuns haunts her, their mad black eyes blazing. Ravencrest is a house of spirits and Belinda is thrust into a world of waking nightmares where there is no distinction between the living and the dead.

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“The Ghosts of Ravencrest delivers on every level. Delicate, creepy, detailed, and beautifully crafted, this reinvention of the gothic ghost story into a sexy, sleek modern chiller is a marvel of suspense and atmosphere. A knockout of a horror yarn!”

– Jay Bonansinga, New York Times bestselling author of The Walking Dead: Invasion, Lucid, and Self Storage

Book 2 in the Ravencrest Saga, THE WITCHES OF RAVENCREST, is also available at Amazon.

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An interesting blend of the classic and the contemporary, LOCK EVERY DOOR pretty much has it all – including surprises you won’t see coming. Part Rosemary’s Baby, part The Sentinel (I even detected a hint of The Shining), LOCK EVERY DOOR follows Jules, an unemployed young woman who’s down on her luck. When she answers an ad and lands a job as an apartment sitter at the prestigious “Bartholomew” in New York City, it seems too good to be true. The Bartholomew adds that spooky gothic vibe I love and is supported by an unusual cast of characters that will (for the most part, anyway) keep you guessing.

I say ‘for the most part’ because the truth is, I found the majority of characters to be thin and transparent; I couldn’t help thinking the book could have been a lot stronger with some better character development. Also, things did get a little over the top regarding Jules’ history and personal hardships. Basically, whatever happened to her was always the absolute worst possible thing and after a while, it started to feel a bit contrived and Jules started sounding a little whiny.

My only other complaint would be that LOCK EVERY DOOR tries to be too many things at once. I can’t help thinking the author was working super hard to please every kind of reader out there: we have the strong female lead to satisfy lovers of women’s fiction, a little whodunit for the mystery readers, a dash of romance for those who love love, a whisper of the supernatural for ghost story connoisseurs, criminal behavior for the crime buffs, the spooky old building for the gothic enthusiasts, and much more. I’m all for genre-blending but at times, this one just tried a little too hard.

But at its heart LOCK EVERY DOOR is horror – in my opinion, anyway – and that’s why I liked it. Despite spreading itself a little too thin, I’d recommend it. This won’t be the last Riley Sager book I read.

For more, visit Alistair on Bookbub

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Rebecca is just as wonderful now as it was the first time I read it as a teen. The tale is the very definition of “Gothic,” and the lush, detailed writing is elegant and romantic in the true sense of the word.

The first name of our narrator is never given, she is simply the second Mrs. DeWinter. Young and inexperienced, she is shy and terribly afraid of nearly everything – the antithesis of the modern heroine. She does not want to offend or rock the boat, but when she comes up against the most horrifying housekeeper in Gothic history – Mrs. Danvers – she begins to find her backbone.

Our heroine’s growth is perfectly done. But what I love most is the spirit of Rebecca herself. The descriptions of how Manderley is her house, that she is all around, are breathtakingly eerie. When Mrs. Danvers speaks of her, she becomes a true ghost. Is the housekeeper a player of Gaslight’s Mr. Manningham’s caliber, or does Rebecca truly walk the halls? To me, the answer is secondary to the beautiful atmospheric writing.

I’m already looking forward to wandering down the halls of Manderley again one day.