Posts Tagged ‘poison’

The Black Wasp is the third book in Alistair’s Vampires of Crimson Cove series – and it’s coming this winter! Here is the cover and teaser. Get the first two books in the series: (#1 – The Crimson Corset and #2 – The Silver Dagger.)

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Something is coming.
Cade Colter is dealing with a group of fanatical vampire killers even as he grieves the death of his girlfriend at the fangs of his own brother. His life is in turmoil and just when it seems things couldn’t get worse a new evil comes to town.
The Woman in Black is back.
Now, something else roams the streets of Crimson Cove – something far deadlier than any vampire. She comes with the fog, she comes with the night, and she’s spreading a lethal poison that slowly rots her victims from the inside out … and she’s looking for Cade.
Sooner or later, you’ll see her, too.
First comes the deadly low hum of a thousand black wasps…
Then a feeling of dread so deep and cold that you dare not breathe…
A figure, a woman dressed in old-fashioned widow’s weeds, appears before you …
Don’t Scream.
She wants to know your terror. She wants to taste your pain.

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Before White Oleander, I wouldn’t have believed I could have become so emotionally invested in a meandering coming of age epic about a 14-year-old orphan (Astrid) as she moves from home to home for one reason or another. The truth is, I only read this book because it was recommended by a friend and, as someone who will read literally anything, I knew I’d get through it without any problem – but I certainly didn’t expect to fall madly in love with it.

But I did. I was riveted from page one and couldn’t put the damned thing down.

I loved following Astrid to each of her new foster homes and watching her grow from the dysfunction and chaos around her. With each move, she meets new people, all of whom shape her in new ways – ways that ultimately help her understand her relationship with her own toxic, narcissistic mother (Ingrid), who has been imprisoned for murder hundreds of miles away.

While the plot is solid enough to stand up on its own, what really captured me here were the characters. These are real people, motivated in real ways, with all the necessary layers to make them well-rounded, dynamic, and believable. If I ever get the chance to meet Janet Fitch, I’d like to shake her hand and thank her for writing such an excellent character study.

Five full stars. I recommend White Oleander to, well, anyone who likes reading books with good plots and great characters.

For more recommendations, visit Alistair on BookBub.