Posts Tagged ‘Tamara Thorne’

Thursday, December 5th, at 8 pm EST, we’ll be chatting with author and associate movie producer. Listen in any time at Thorne & Cross: Haunted Nights LIVE!

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Joshua A.H. Harris is a writer, father, and recovering environmental attorney. He grew up in Laramie, Wyoming, served in the Peace Corps in Mali, West Africa, and currently lives in the Bay Area. Joshua holds degrees from Brown University, UC Davis, and San Francisco State University. His writings have appeared in the East Bay Times, Gravitas (Pub House Books), Berkeley Times, and Ars Poetica. In 2014, he wrote Out of the Fog, a serialized novel released one chapter per week over the course of a calendar year (available at outofthefogjh.blogspot.com). In 2017, Joshua became an associate editor for La Vil: Stories from the Streets of Port-au-Prince, Voice of Witness (San Francisco). More recently, he wrote and published Common Sense 2019: A Bipartisan Call to Take Back Our Government, a political pamphlet that addresses the fundamental problem of money in politics. Joshua is also an associate producer of the following movies: Night Comes On (2018) starring Dominique Fishback and Tatum Marilyn Hall; House of Tomorrow (2017), starring Asa Butterfield; Lucky (2017), starring Harry Dean Stanton; and Columbus (2017), starring John Cho, Haley Lu Richardson, Parker Posey.

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Join the Thorne & Cross newsletter for updates, book deals, specials, exclusives, and upcoming guests on Thorne & Cross: Haunted Nights LIVE! by visiting Tamara and Alistair at their websites: alistaircross.com and tamarathorne.com

This is a copyrighted, trademarked podcast owned solely by the Authors on the Air Global Radio, LLC.

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Our gothic horror novel, The Ghosts of Ravencrest (book 1 in the Ravencrest Saga) is on sale for $0.99 in #ebook at Amazon today through the 20th!

THE GHOSTS OF RAVENCREST

(Book 1 in The Ravencrest Saga)

Ravencrest Manor casts long, black shadows across its grand lawns, through the surrounding forests, and over the picturesque town of Devilswood, below. It holds its memories – and its ghosts – close to its dark heart.

When governess Belinda Moorland arrives at Ravencrest to tutor Eric Manning’s children, it’s the most beautiful place she’s ever seen, but she soon learns that not only is it built on secrets, but its inhabitants keep plenty of their own – from the elegant English butler to the power-mad administrator, to handsome millionaire Eric Manning himself, who watches her with dark, fathomless eyes. But Belinda soon realizes that the living who dwell in Ravencrest have nothing on the others – the ones who walk the darkened halls by night … the ones who enter her dreams … the ones who are watching … and waiting … 

Ghostly screams echo as bony fingers clutch at her in the indoor pool. The spirit of a long-dead child calls to her. A trio of gibbering nuns haunts her, their mad black eyes blazing. Ravencrest is a house of spirits and Belinda is thrust into a world of waking nightmares where there is no distinction between the living and the dead.

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“The Ghosts of Ravencrest delivers on every level. Delicate, creepy, detailed, and beautifully crafted, this reinvention of the gothic ghost story into a sexy, sleek modern chiller is a marvel of suspense and atmosphere. A knockout of a horror yarn!”

– Jay Bonansinga, New York Times bestselling author of The Walking Dead: Invasion, Lucid, and Self Storage

Book 2 in the Ravencrest Saga, THE WITCHES OF RAVENCREST, is also available at Amazon.

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Rebecca is just as wonderful now as it was the first time I read it as a teen. The tale is the very definition of “Gothic,” and the lush, detailed writing is elegant and romantic in the true sense of the word.

The first name of our narrator is never given, she is simply the second Mrs. DeWinter. Young and inexperienced, she is shy and terribly afraid of nearly everything – the antithesis of the modern heroine. She does not want to offend or rock the boat, but when she comes up against the most horrifying housekeeper in Gothic history – Mrs. Danvers – she begins to find her backbone.

Our heroine’s growth is perfectly done. But what I love most is the spirit of Rebecca herself. The descriptions of how Manderley is her house, that she is all around, are breathtakingly eerie. When Mrs. Danvers speaks of her, she becomes a true ghost. Is the housekeeper a player of Gaslight’s Mr. Manningham’s caliber, or does Rebecca truly walk the halls? To me, the answer is secondary to the beautiful atmospheric writing.

I’m already looking forward to wandering down the halls of Manderley again one day.

 

In honor of the spooky season, you can get two ghost-laden Thorne & Cross novels in ebook for $0.99!

Haunted

Haunted is Tamara’s classic ghost story containing a bevy of spirits and horrors – from good-hearted dead hookers to a headless sea captain, a voodoo priestess, evil dolls, cold spots, sex dungeons, lonely lighthouses, and more succubi than you can shake your stick at. Can horror writer David Masters and his intrepid daughter, Amber, survive the terrors of Baudey House? Read Haunted to find out!

Savannah

In Alistair’s paranormal murder mystery, Sleep Savannah Sleep, newcomer Jason Crandall moves his family into the old Victorian in Shadow Springs with high hopes for a new beginning – but after beautiful young socialite, Savannah Sturgess, goes missing, he’s plagued by haunting visions and terrifying dreams. By day, strange things happen in the old house; mysterious footsteps, chill phantom breezes – and the nights are even worse. Is Savannah herself trying to tell him that the dead don’t always rest in peace? Get your copy of Sleep Savannah Sleep to find out.

Sale ends October 14th, 2019

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Gretchen is a thriller that will also appeal to lovers of horror. It’s told primarily from the point of view of Lucy, a teen who has spent her life on the run with her mother. Lucy has always been resigned to her fate – changing states, changing schools, keeping secrets – but now she’s beginning to rebel.

As the book begins, Lucy and her mother relocate to house in the country outside a small town. Their new landlord, a concert pianist, and his daughter, Gretchen, welcome them, and despite their eccentricities, Lucy wants to stay. From there, the eccentricities and Lucy’s discomfort grow, and the story – a fascinating mystery – unfolds.

The pages of this tight and twisted tale flew by – I could hardly turn them fast enough. Highly recommended.

For more: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/tamara-thorne?list=reviews

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I didn’t mean to read The Institute so fast. I meant to make it last, but with King, that’s usually impossible. I was eager to read this book because it’s vintage King. There’s a good whiff of Firestarter in the book simply because of setting and subject matter, but the story is handled quite differently. In Firestarter, certain bad guys, like Rainbird, really stood out to me, but here, they’re more of a troop, but each is well drawn and memorable in true King style.

The kids are well-drawn as well and very easy to tell apart. What The Institute has in common with the novel, It, is simply that it features a group of kids drawn together to fight for themselves. These kids are misfits for the most part and this plays out in wonderful ways.

Our primary hero is a super-intelligent boy named Luke. When I was near the half-way point in the book I was beginning to wonder if things were going to get more interesting. (Not that it wasn’t interesting, but I wanted a change of scenery.) There’s no need to worry. There’s more. Lots more.

The book explodes into a long climax mid-way and all the details carefully planted in the first half come into play. It becomes impossible to set the book down. And it all leads to a terrific and satisfying ending. The Institute is going to make a terrific movie one day. I can’t wait to see it.

For more: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/tamara-thorne?list=reviews

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I first read The Haunting of Hill House as a child when I happened on it at the library. It changed the course of my reading and my own writing. I’ve reread it half a dozen times over the years. Recently, after at least a fifteen-year hiatus, I read it again. It’s as wonderful as ever, and it held a few forgotten surprises, too.

The 1960 movie is very true to the book but it leaves out a mysterious scene that happens late in the book. Theo and Eleanor go outside and encounter a child’s birthday party. They see a dog; perhaps the same creature that leads the men away from the house early in the book. And then they see something else that sends them running back to Hill House in terror.

The chapter ends there and when it picks up it’s obvious they’ve told the men what they saw – but Jackson never informs the reader. I don’t know how I ever forgot about this delightfully creepy twist, but now it haunts me. What did they see? I’m going to read the book yet again very soon because of it. I had just turned 11 the first time I read it and I was struck by the stone lions and the cup of stars almost as much as the scrabbling at the doors and the phantom hand-holding.

I saw only a ghost story back then and I adored it. Later, I understood the psychological aspects as well as the sexual ones but preferred to remember my more innocent impressions. This time, in full maturity, I loved it for everything it contained. It’s a beautiful, elegant tragedy and probably the best ghost story ever written.

For more: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/tamara-thorne?list=reviews